Medical cannabis

Access to medical cannabis is tightly restricted here in New Zealand, and progress towards a more liberal approach is slow. I understand that doctors are allowed to prescribe Sativex on an individual basis for such conditions as advanced multiple sclerosis or intractable epilepsy, but that many are reluctant to do so, and that patients have to meet the high cost of the product themselves. And following a recent law change, people with terminal illness can now use home grown cannabis without fear of prosecution for themselves or those who supply them. But using cannabis outside of these circumstances still carries heavy penalties; according to the police website, these range from a $500 fine for possession to a 14 year jail term for supply or manufacture. This despite the fact that cannabis, with its analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumour, anticonvulsant, antispasmodic, anxiolytic and sedative effects, has been used for healing purposes for thousands of years and is now legal in many other parts of the world. Cannabis oil can be taken by mouth, inhaled, or applied to the skin.

My personal interest in this topic began in an unusual way. Unlike many students I never tried cannabis at university, because I moved in fairly conventional circles and also had an aversion to smoking. Then last year I was intrigued when a homeopath suggested that Cannabis sativa would be a good remedy for me. Shortly after this I came across a series of online documentaries called The Sacred Plant promoting the value of cannabis for treating cancer, epilepsy, arthritis, multiple sclerosis, other autoimmune disorders, and AIDS. While this series was focused on the benefits of cannabis, with minimal discussion of any potential downside, it convinced me that this plant has huge medicinal potential and has been unfairly stigmatised. Heavy recreational use can certainly be harmful especially for adolescents, but it seems wrong to criminalise sick people who are seeking the plant’s therapeutic effects.

Formal research on patient populations has been hampered by the legal constraints but there are some published clinical trials, besides many laboratory studies and a wealth of anecdotal evidence, supporting its use. The National Cancer Institute in the USA has produced an excellent review, including a detailed version for professionals and a simpler one for patients, not limited to the cancer setting. Cannabis can alleviate symptoms of pain, nausea and vomiting (including that caused by chemotherapy), lack of appetite and weight loss, anxiety and insomnia. Importantly, it also has potential for treating the disease which underlies these symptoms. Like any effective drug cannabis can have unwanted effects and interactions, but these usually seem to be mild in comparison with those of many orthodox medications.

Two main constituents of Cannabis sativa are THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) and CBD (cannabidiol). Both have medicinal properties but THC is mainly responsible for the “high” sought by recreational users, whereas CBD has minimal psychoactive activity and can be freely purchased over the counter in many countries including UK, Australia and many states of America. The plant also contains hundreds of other chemical compounds, found in varying proportions in the seeds, leaves and stalks and depending on which strain is used, and there is still much to learn about how its extracts can best be prepared and used medicinally.

My own health is reasonably good but I do have a few medical problems of a kind that could be helped by CBD, and am tempted to buy some on my next overseas trip. But I doubt it would get past the clever beagle dogs who patrol Auckland Airport to sniff out illicit drugs.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: Logo

You are commenting using your account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s