Comparing Bach flowers and homeopathy

What is the relationship between Bach flower remedies and homeopathic ones? Both are “energy medicines”, prepared from natural substances in dilutions too small to measure by chemical analysis.  Their mode of action is not understood, so as far as I know it is not possible to say what basic difference – if any – exists between them. Dr Edward Bach had studied homeopathy before discovering his flower remedies, and the two modalities certainly have some features in common. There are also several points of contrast, as listed below. It will be clear from what follows that the Bach system is much simpler than the homeopathic one.

* Bach flowers are prescribed on the basis of current emotional state, whereas the choice of homeopathic remedies requires a more detailed consultation taking both physical and psychological factors, both past and present, into account.

* Homeopathic remedies for particular disorders are identified on the basis of “provings”, according to the principle of “like treats like”. For example, if taking a certain remedy causes healthy volunteers to develop itching, that remedy might be effective for treating an itchy skin complaint. The Bach flowers, in contrast, were identified in a purely intuitive way by Edward Bach, who would experience a certain feeling such as anxiety or despair and then seek for a plant which would alleviate it.  

* There are thousands of homeopathic remedies to choose from, but only 38 Bach flowers.

* Homeopathic remedies may be derived from animal, plant or mineral sources, some of which are toxic in their original form. The Bach flowers are all (with the exception of Rock Water) made from non-poisonous plants.

* With classical homeopathy, the aim is to identify the single remedy which best resonates with the client. With Bach flowers, although there are some “type remedies” appropriate for different personalities, it is usual practice to choose a combination of several remedies up to a maximum of six.

* Homeopathic remedies are prescribed in a range of potencies and dosage regimes, whereas Bach flowers are taken on a simple standard schedule (4 drops 4 times a day).

Some practitioners say both systems can be used together, because they act at different “levels”, others believe they should be kept separate.

I am not a trained homeopath myself but have made some informal study of the system, and both Bach flowers and homeopathic remedies play a part in the plots of my three short novels.

 

Completing the trilogy

I tend not to plan much ahead in my life, and back at the beginning of this year I had no idea that I was going to publish a series of three novellas during 2014 – marking the launch of what I hope will be an on-going career as an indie author.

The Windflower Vibration, the third book in the trilogy, has just come out. Please read on for the blurb, and details of a free offer on the e-book version.

“A man dies while swimming off an Auckland beach. Georgina is out walking with her grandson when the rescue helicopter arrives, and they become involved in the aftermath of the event. Was this man’s death due to natural causes hastened by medical malpractice? Or was it one strand in a complex web of events, spread over two hemispheres and two centuries, involving homeopathy, Elgar’s violin concerto, forbidden love affairs and a sick dog? Georgina’s life has seemed empty following the loss of her husband, but by the end of her quest to unravel these mysteries she has found a new purpose. Set partly in England and partly in New Zealand, The Windflower Vibration can be read on its own or as a sequel to Jennifer Barraclough’s earlier novellas Carmen’s Roses and Blue Moon for Bombers.”

The Windflower Vibration is available in both print and ebook versions from Amazon and other online stores. Between now and the end of this year, I can offer readers of this blog a free copy of the e-version from Smashwords: if you are interested, click on this link and enter the coupon code GP73W at check-out.

I would hugely appreciate your help with marketing; please consider posting a star rating, writing a brief review on Amazon or elsewhere, sharing this message with your contacts and/or asking your local library to buy a copy – thank you so much.